The M-5; Goulburn

- 11 July 2001 (a.m.) -


The M-5, on the way to Canberra.
(photo by Yansa)

The M-5 isn't too different from Oregon's I-5, except that everyone drives on the left side of the road. Plus, all the vegetation is wacky, and July is in the middle of winter on the M-5. But otherwise, it's very similar ;)

The terrain looked a lot like I-5 scenery in the middle of summer... which isn't too surprising, since winter is the dry season in New South Wales, and summer is our dry season.


The M-5, on the way to Canberra.
(photo by Yansa)

Not too different from I-5 through the Salem Hills, really, except in the details. Note the very Australian-looking trees on the hillside to the left. 


Wombat Crossing!
(photo by Yansa)

I tried to get a picture of a "kangaroo crossing" sign, but my camera didn't want to take the photo (I kept clicking and clicking and clicking and clicking, and I never heard the beep :/ ) 

I got a grainy picture of a "wombat crossing" sign, though! Unfortunately, it didn't capture one very cool detail: The wombat on the sign is a smiley wombat! The wombat on the sign is smiling! It's so cute!! :)

Why can't the deer on our "deer crossing" signs be grinning from ear to ear? ;)


The M-5, on the way to Canberra.
(photo by Yansa)

Some typical New South Wales scenery.


The M-5, on the way to Canberra.
(photo by Yansa)

Note the Coca-Cola truck on the right side of the road.


Baaaaa!
(photo by Yansa)

This is the Big Merino.

The Big Merino is a gigantic cement sheep statue in the town of Goulburn, New South Wales (pop: 25,000), a town that looks eerily similar to Walla Walla, Washington (pop: 25,000).

Why does the Big Merino have a red nose? Diabetes Awareness Week, that's why! (Diabetes Awareness Week, where everyone was supposed to wear red buttons, was July 23rd or something similar, so they decided to put a red nose on the Big Merino. I was there at a very special time indeed!) 


Australian flag, Kat, Big Merino sign. 
(photo by Yansa)

My friend Kat in front of the entrance to the Big Merino. 


Yansa, and part of the sheep statue. 
(photo by Kat)

Here I am standing in front of the Big Merino. 


RiÁk, just about to look out the eye of the Big Merino. 
(photo by Yansa)

You can go inside the Big Merino! You can climb up to the third floor of the Big Merino, browse through exhibits on the history of wool in Australia, and look out the eyes of the Big Merino! And we did just that (sans browsing the exhibits, which were quite dull).


Kat, about to take a picture out the eye of the Big Merino.
(photo by Yansa)

Note the wool exhibit to the right. Don't wear anything other than wool, or your clothing will catch on fire!

I have the very same picture that Kat took...


Sheep's eye view of Goulburn.
(photo by Kat)

Voilŗ!

(Goulburn looks a lot like Walla Walla.)

This is a view from the right eye of the Big Merino.


More of a sheep's eye view of Goulburn.
(photo by Yansa)

OK, so Walla Walla doesn't have forested hills within view. But the rest of it looks like Walla Walla, dammit! ;)

This is a view from the left eye of the Big Merino.


Another sheep's eye view of Goulburn.
(photo by Yansa)

This is another view from the right eye of the Big Merino.

This residential view is rather atypical; most (~99%) of the Australian houses that I saw are made of brick, and they have red tile roofs.


Aussie flag, Big Merino sign, RiÁk, Bek.
(photo by Kat)

Here's RiÁk (above sign) and Bek (below sign) at the entrance to the Big Merino.   


Yansa, Bek, and RiÁk, outside Bek's car.
(photo by Kat)

This is us after a brief snack break outside the Big Merino.

RiÁk is holding a bag of triangular-shaped, air-filled corn puffs (I forget their name). They're not bad, but they're not Burger Rings. ;)


Bek, RiÁk, Kat, big honkin' sheep with a silly-looking red nose in a town that looks eerily similar to Walla Walla.
(photo by Yansa)

Need I say more?

(If Walla Walla ever decides to build a gigantic sheep statue, I will not know whether to laugh or cry. ;) )


Text written 17 August 2001.
Last updated 19 January 2006.

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